Becoming Perceptive · Reflecting

“Spark of the divine”

“Our supreme purpose in life is not to make a fortune, nor to pursue pleasure, nor to write our name on history, but to discover this spark of the divine that is in our hearts…when we realize this goal, we discover simultaneously that the divinity within ourselves is one and the same in all—all individuals, all creatures, all of life. . . .

A mystic is one who not only espouses these principles of the Perennial Philosophy but lives them, whose every action reflects the wisdom and selfless love that are the hallmark of one who has made this supreme discovery. Such a person has made the divine a reality in every moment of life, and that reality shines through whatever he or she may do or say—and that is the real test. . . . [A mystic is marked by] an unbroken awareness of the presence of God in all creatures. The signs are clear: unfailing compassion, fearlessness, equanimity, and the unshakable knowledge, based on direct, personal experience, that all the treasures and pleasures of this world together are worth nothing if one has not found the uncreated light at the center of the soul.”

–Adapted from Eknath Easwaran, Original Goodness (Nilgiri Press: 1989, 1996), 8-10 in Richard Rohr’s Daily Meditation, August 15, 2019

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Becoming Perceptive · Reflecting · Words

“The prayer of the contemplative…”

“The prayer of the contemplative is, essentially, an attention to the omnipresence of God. God is omnipresent not as a theological doctrine, but as the great silence that is present in every moment—but from which we are usually distracted by an overactive mind that refuses to wait in a humble unknowing for a pure wisdom from above [James 3:17].”

Richard Rohr, Richard Rohr Meditation, “Beholding,” August 13, 2019

Learning · Listening · Reflecting

More difficult topics

Reading about Black Theology of Liberation as developed by James H. Cone:

The Cross and the Lynching Tree, James H. Cone, 2011.

A Black Theology of Liberation, James H. Cone, 1990.

Black Theology & Black Power, James H. Cone, 1969.

Go Tell it on the Mountain, James Baldwin, 1953.

Strange Fruit: The Cross and the Lynching Tree (video of James Cone lecturing at Harvard Divinity School)

James Cone: The Cross and the Lynching Tree, 2012 General Conference of the United Methodist Church (video)

Religion & Violence: James Cone Interview (video)

Bill Moyers Journal: James Cone (video)

https://livingchurch.org/2018/05/14/the-glorious-complicated-legacy-of-james-h-cone/

https://www.christiancentury.org/article/first-person/what-i-learned-student-james-cones (there are links on this to other articles)

Billie Holiday singing “Strange Fruit” (video)

Hope to have thoughts as I read, listen, reflect and learn more.

 

Love · Reflecting

Love

LOVE
by Czesław Miłosz

Love means to learn to look at yourself
The way one looks at distant things
For you are only one thing among many.
And whoever sees that way heals his heart,
Without knowing it, from various ills.
A bird and a tree say to him: Friend.

Then he wants to use himself and things
So that they stand in the glow of ripeness.
It doesn’t matter whether he knows what he serves:
Who serves best doesn’t always understand.

As read here except color highlights added by me.

Parker Palmer reflected on these words with respect to the meaning of life here.

Love · Reflecting

Wild Geese, a poem by Mary Oliver

WILD GEESE

You do not have to be good.

You do not have to walk on your knees

for a hundred miles through the desert, repenting.

You only have to let the soft animal of your body

love what it loves.

Tell me about despair, yours, and I will tell you mine.

Meanwhile, the world goes on.

Meanwhile the sun and the clear pebbles of the rain

are moving across the landscapes,

Over the prairies and the deep trees,

the mountains and the rivers.

Meanwhile the wild geese, high in the clean blue air

are heading home again.

Whoever you are, no matter how lonely,

the world offers itself to your imagination,

calls to you like the wild geese, harsh and exciting —

over and over announcing your place

in the family of things.

With a perspective on welcoming the different parts of yourself by Patty de Llosa here.