Faith · Reflecting · Words

Does this resonate with you?

Richard Rohr’s Daily Meditation

From the Center for Action and Contemplation

Church: Old and New

If We Were Christian

Friday, November 1, 2019
All Saints’ Day

“…Quaker pastor Philip Gulley superbly summarizes how we must rebuild spirituality from the bottom up in his book, If the Church Were Christian. [3] Here I take the liberty of using my own words to restate his message, which offers a rather excellent description of what is emerging in Christianity today:

  1. Jesus is a model for living more than an object of worship.
  2. Affirming people’s potential is more important than reminding them of their brokenness.
  3. The work of reconciliation should be valued over making judgments.
  4. Gracious behavior is more important than right belief.
  5. Inviting questions is more valuable than supplying answers.
  6. Encouraging the personal search is more important than group uniformity.
  7. Meeting actual needs is more important than maintaining institutions.
  8. Peacemaking is more important than power.
  9. We should care more about love and less about sex.
  10. Life in this world is more important than the afterlife (Eternity is God’s work anyway).

If this makes sense to you, you are already participating in evolving Christianity. Do read it several times. It only makes more and more sense…

[3] See Philip Gulley, If the Church Were Christian: Rediscovering the Values of Jesus (HarperOne: 2010). This list is adapted from his chapter titles…

Adapted from Richard Rohr, “Emerging Christianity: A Non-Dual Vision,” Radical Grace, vol. 23, no. 1 (Center for Action and Contemplation: 2010), 3, 22.”

Feeling · Learning · Reflecting

Studies show people don’t like–even avoid–solitude. Why?

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/28/smarter-living/the-benefits-of-being-alone.html?fallback=false&recId=492417555&locked=1&geoContinent=NA&geoRegion=NC&recAlloc=random&geoCountry=US&blockId=home-living&imp_id=423177595&action=click&module=Smarter%20Living&pgtype=Homepage

https://news.virginia.edu/content/doing-something-better-doing-nothing-most-people-study-shows

Becoming Perceptive · Reflecting · Words

Read about the “Wood Wide Web”–you’ll be glad you did

ESSAY

The Understory

http://www.dailygood.org/more.php?n=8231

Faith · Love · Reflecting · Words

The Feast Day of St. Francis of Assisi

A prayer attributed to St. Francis

Lord, make us instruments of your peace.

Where there is hatred, let us sow love;

where there is injury, pardon;

where there is discord, union;

where there is doubt, faith;

where there is despair, hope;

where there is darkness, light;

where there is sadness, joy.

Grant that we may not so much seek to be consoled as to console;

to be understood as to understand;

to be loved as to love.

For it is in giving that we receive;

it is in pardoning that we are pardoned;

and it is in dying that we are born to eternal life.

Amen.

Becoming Perceptive · Reflecting

“Spark of the divine”

“Our supreme purpose in life is not to make a fortune, nor to pursue pleasure, nor to write our name on history, but to discover this spark of the divine that is in our hearts…when we realize this goal, we discover simultaneously that the divinity within ourselves is one and the same in all—all individuals, all creatures, all of life. . . .

A mystic is one who not only espouses these principles of the Perennial Philosophy but lives them, whose every action reflects the wisdom and selfless love that are the hallmark of one who has made this supreme discovery. Such a person has made the divine a reality in every moment of life, and that reality shines through whatever he or she may do or say—and that is the real test. . . . [A mystic is marked by] an unbroken awareness of the presence of God in all creatures. The signs are clear: unfailing compassion, fearlessness, equanimity, and the unshakable knowledge, based on direct, personal experience, that all the treasures and pleasures of this world together are worth nothing if one has not found the uncreated light at the center of the soul.”

–Adapted from Eknath Easwaran, Original Goodness (Nilgiri Press: 1989, 1996), 8-10 in Richard Rohr’s Daily Meditation, August 15, 2019

Becoming Perceptive · Reflecting · Words

“The prayer of the contemplative…”

“The prayer of the contemplative is, essentially, an attention to the omnipresence of God. God is omnipresent not as a theological doctrine, but as the great silence that is present in every moment—but from which we are usually distracted by an overactive mind that refuses to wait in a humble unknowing for a pure wisdom from above [James 3:17].”

Richard Rohr, Richard Rohr Meditation, “Beholding,” August 13, 2019

Learning · Listening · Reflecting

More difficult topics

Reading about Black Theology of Liberation as developed by James H. Cone:

The Cross and the Lynching Tree, James H. Cone, 2011.

A Black Theology of Liberation, James H. Cone, 1990.

Black Theology & Black Power, James H. Cone, 1969.

Go Tell it on the Mountain, James Baldwin, 1953.

Strange Fruit: The Cross and the Lynching Tree (video of James Cone lecturing at Harvard Divinity School)

James Cone: The Cross and the Lynching Tree, 2012 General Conference of the United Methodist Church (video)

Religion & Violence: James Cone Interview (video)

Bill Moyers Journal: James Cone (video)

https://livingchurch.org/2018/05/14/the-glorious-complicated-legacy-of-james-h-cone/

https://www.christiancentury.org/article/first-person/what-i-learned-student-james-cones (there are links on this to other articles)

Billie Holiday singing “Strange Fruit” (video)

Hope to have thoughts as I read, listen, reflect and learn more.

 

Love · Reflecting

Love

LOVE
by Czesław Miłosz

Love means to learn to look at yourself
The way one looks at distant things
For you are only one thing among many.
And whoever sees that way heals his heart,
Without knowing it, from various ills.
A bird and a tree say to him: Friend.

Then he wants to use himself and things
So that they stand in the glow of ripeness.
It doesn’t matter whether he knows what he serves:
Who serves best doesn’t always understand.

As read here except color highlights added by me.

Parker Palmer reflected on these words with respect to the meaning of life here.